Curriculum

As a forward-looking, academically rigorous college-prep school, RHP provides a carefully crafted curriculum that offers an array of traditional courses taught using proven and engaging techniques. Complementing the traditional curriculum are several innovative courses designed to serve students who will graduate from college in the middle of a fast-changing century. Mandarin, computer coding, World History, horticulture, Human Service Organizations, internships, public speaking, and robotics are among our most innovative courses. All coursework emphasizes critical skills that will allow students to thrive after graduating from RHP. These skills are collectively referred to as “The Five Cs”: critical thinking, collaboration, communication, creativity, and character. Teachers continually push students to hone and refine these traits as they prepare for life in college and beyond.

All aspects of the RHP experience make up the curriculum: math, science, art, music, drama, outdoor education, service learning, band, chorus, history, English, field trips, International Day, World Dance Week, pep assemblies, PE, athletics, Grandparents and Friends Day, coffee house, publications, National Honor society, clubs, pick-up basketball games, dances, coding, the list goes on. Everything that happens on and off campus is a valuable part of an RHP student's learning experience and is designed to develop in each student their disciplined mind, sound character, creative spirit and healthy body.
 

Graduation Requirements

For graduation, the school requires completion of the following credits (10 credits = 1 school year) for a total of 225 credits:
  • English - 40 credits
  • Mathematics - 30 credits
  • History - 35 credits
  • Economics - 5 credits
  • Science - 30 credits
  • World Languages - 30 credits
  • Arts - 20 credits
  • P.E. - 20 credits
  • Electives - 10 credits

Note: This is a minimum. Competitive colleges and universities expect more.
 

Outdoor Education

RHP and Ren's Outdoor Education program intentionally takes students (and teachers too) out of their comfort zones. During the week, the community is removed from the noise of televisions, cell phones, and traffic and placed in situations where appreciation and understanding of nature, ecosystems, and environmental issues emerge. Cooperation and collaboration are not only encouraged but required for many of the activities.

Many students are outdoorsy types and just love every moment. Others prefer the indoors and don't mind saying so. In many ways, the latter students benefit most from the program because they are doing things they might never have done in their life and may never do again. It is these students who otherwise might have had a really hard time with unfamiliarity and independence during those first few weeks away at college, but now are more prepared to meet the challenges of living away from home, dealing with roommates, and cooking, eating, and cleaning on their own when that time comes.
 

Senior Internships

RHP and Ren have been requiring short unpaid internships of its graduating seniors for the last twenty years. Students have worked in businesses, hospitals, schools, and non-profit organizations. Students are asked to work at least thirty hours per week for two weeks at the end of May.

The goal of the internship is to acquaint young people with the “real world,” a world that they have been educated to enter, but do not know very well. They need to observe people at work, help with any tasks they can accomplish, take orders and fulfill jobs, show interest and enthusiasm for a career, practice business etiquette, and learn new skills. Many colleges require students to find and complete internships as part of their graduation requirements. We tell students that this internship is probably the start of several internships that will follow before they find themselves in a permanent job.